Accident Leaving Work I recently had a very annoying experience.

I was sued.

I own a business, so I might as well have a target on my back that says, “SUE ME.”

It is seriously ridiculous. The lawyer part of me says, “why does anyone own a business?” The entrepreneur part of me says, “screw those guys, they aren’t taking me down!”

But I digress. I was sued. Why? Because I was driving a car when someone broadsided me in an intersection. As the insurance company dawdled on settlement, the woman who hit me learned that I owned a business (through the magic of Google, I presume). She thought she could threaten me and my business insurances and assets.

You see, if you or your employees are driving within the scope of business or employment, then the business can be liable if you cause an accident.

I wasn’t driving anywhere on business nor was I at fault, but those details didn’t seem to matter to her. Fortunately, I own a law firm, so her lawsuit did not last very long.

Still, it made me think about the employer liability rules for employees. Do you have a company car? Or do your employees sometimes go on errands, drive to see clients or take pit stops from lunch or work? Do they go to more than one office?

If so, you have some risk as a business and business owner if they get in an accident. (Uber’s strategy to avoid this is to classify everyone as independent contractors. It won’t work in the end and is not recommended. Uber has a lot of money to spare for legal fees so that they can delay and game the system; but most businesses don’t and this strategy will make things worse for them.)

Here’s a little video outlining some of the things you should consider when it comes to employees driving. Get insurance accordingly. And talk to your lawyer about ways to keep you lawsuit-free.

Video Transcription:

Say your employee got into a car accident driving home from work. Can you get sued or be held liable for the accident?

Like many questions in law, the answer depends on the facts.

The answer is “yes” if the employee was driving a company vehicle.

The answer is “no” if the employee was driving their own vehicle as part of their daily commute.

The answer is complicated when the employee sometimes uses his or her car for work during business hours.

Or if the employee is not commuting at the time of the accident.

For example, the employee is driving home from a different office or job site than usual.

Or from a side errand run for the employer.

In these scenarios, the employer may get sued, but may win at trial anyway.

Confused about possible risks or liabilities in your business? To get peace of mind, call us for a Business Risk Review at 800-449-8992 or email us at [email protected].

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